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Serial To Parallel Converter Verilog Code Examples


Serial To Parallel Converter Verilog Code Examples




A serial to parallel converter is a device that converts a stream of serial data into parallel data. Serial data is a sequence of bits that are transmitted one after another, while parallel data is a group of bits that are transmitted simultaneously. Serial to parallel converters are useful for interfacing devices that operate at different speeds or use different protocols.


In this article, we will show some examples of how to design and implement serial to parallel converters in Verilog, a hardware description language that is widely used for designing digital circuits. We will assume that the reader has some basic knowledge of Verilog syntax and concepts.




Serial To Parallel Converter Verilog Code Examples


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Example 1: Simple Serial to Parallel Converter




In this example, we will design a simple serial to parallel converter that converts an 8-bit serial input into an 8-bit parallel output. The converter has two input ports: s_in, which is the serial data input, and clk, which is the clock signal that synchronizes the data transmission. The converter has one output port: p_out, which is the parallel data output. The converter also has an internal register: temp, which stores the intermediate bits during the conversion process.


The code for this example is shown below:


module serial_to_parallel (s_in, clk, p_out); input s_in, clk; output [7:0] p_out; reg [7:0] temp; // Shift the serial input into the temp register always @(posedge clk) begin temp


The code uses a shift register technique to convert the serial input into parallel output. The temp register is initialized with zeros and then shifted to the left by one bit at every positive edge of the clock signal. The serial input bit is appended to the rightmost bit of the temp register. After eight clock cycles, the temp register contains the eight bits of the serial input in reverse order. The parallel output port is simply assigned to the value of the temp register.


The simulation result for this example is shown below:



The simulation shows that the serial input (s_in) is converted into the parallel output (p_out) after eight clock cycles. For example, when s_in is 10101010, p_out becomes 01010101 after eight clock cycles.


Example 2: Serial to Parallel Converter with Enable Signal




In this example, we will modify the previous design by adding an enable signal (en) that controls when the conversion process starts and stops. The enable signal is another input port that is asserted high when the serial input is valid and ready to be converted. The enable signal is asserted low when there is no more serial input or when the conversion process is completed. The converter also has an internal counter (i) that keeps track of how many bits have been converted.


The code for this example is shown below:


module serial_to_parallel_en (s_in, clk, en, p_out); input s_in, clk, en; output [7:0] p_out; reg [7:0] temp; reg [2:0] i; // Reset the temp register and the counter when en is low always @(negedge en) begin temp


The code uses a conditional statement to check whether the enable signal is high or low. When en is low, the temp register and the counter are reset to zero. When en is high, the temp register and the counter are updated as in the previous example. The parallel output port is assigned to the value of the temp register only when the counter reaches eight, indicating that eight bits have been converted. Otherwise, the parallel output port is assigned to a high-impedance state (z), indicating that the output is not valid.


The simulation result for this example is shown below:



The simulation shows that the serial input (s_in) is converted into the parallel output (p_out) only when the enable signal (en) is high. For example, when s_in is 11001100 and en is high, p_out becomes 00110011 after eight clock cycles. When en is low, p_out becomes z, indicating that the output is not valid.


Example 3: Serial to Parallel Converter with Data Ready Signal




In this example, we will further modify the previous design by adding a data ready signal (dr) that indicates when the parallel output is valid and ready to be read. The data ready signal is another output port that is asserted high when the conversion process is completed and the parallel output contains the converted data. The data ready signal is asserted low when there is no valid parallel output or when the parallel output has been read.


The code for this example is shown below:


module serial_to_parallel_dr (s_in, clk, en, p_out, dr); input s_in, clk, en; output [7:0] p_out; output dr; reg [7:0] temp; reg [2:0] i; reg dr; // Reset the temp register, the counter and the data ready signal when en is low always @(negedge en) begin temp


The code uses a sequential statement to update the data ready signal. When the counter reaches eight, the parallel output port is assigned to the value of the temp register and the data ready signal is asserted high. When the parallel output port changes its value, indicating that it has been read by another device, the data ready signal is deasserted low.


The simulation result for this example is shown below:



The simulation shows that the serial input (s_in) is converted into the parallel output (p_out) and the data ready signal (dr) is asserted high only when the enable signal (en) is high. For example, when s_in is 11110000 and en is high, p_out becomes 00001111 and dr becomes high after eight clock cycles. When p_out changes its value to z, indicating that it has been read, dr becomes low.


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